Introduction

  1. About – The whole idea of this site is to speed up the learning process…
  2. Inspiration – Some artists are captivating with just a guitar and a microphone…
  3. Guitar Gear – Roadmap.  Ideally, you’d play your electric guitar with a metronome and without an amp for a while to be nice to your house mates…
  4. Guitar Care – No Hot Cars, No Sudden Temperature Changes, …
  5. Guitar Setup – I do all my own setups, and here’s what I do…

Beginner

  1. Guitar Parts – Head: The part where the tuning keys attach…
  2. Holding the Guitar – Classical Guitarists prop up their left foot, and hold the guitar very upright.  In this position, their wrist is straight and they have easy access to all the strings…
  3. Fretting the Strings – On your fretting hand, arch your fingers and press straight down with your fingertips to help each string ring out…
  4. Holding the Pick – Hold the pick between the first finger and thumb…
  5. Names of the Open Strings – There are several tunings, but the most common one is Standard Tuning, also called EADGBE…
  6. Tuning the Guitar – The notes of the open strings are 5 half steps, or 5 frets apart, except for the 3rd to 2nd string, which is 4 half steps apart.  We can use this to tune the guitar…
  7. First Position Notes – This is easy to get this down if you learn one string at a time…
  8. Reading Music – Musical notation is a way to save your musical ideas on paper…
  9. Ear Training – Melody Lines – Ear Training is an important skill to add to your arsenal.  Let’s start by listing to and playing back some simple melody lines…
  10. Song Writing – Lyrics and Melody Lines – It’s never too early to start developing your song writing skills…
  11. Reading Chord Diagrams – Chord diagrams show you how to finger chords…
  12. Open Chords – Open chords are played in the first position and typically contain an open string…
  13. Basic Strumming – This video shows a smooth down and up motion.  The strum is actually a gentle arc…
  14. Basic Strumming Rhythms – Hear are some basic strumming rhythms to get you started…
  15. Muting Techniques – There are 3 common types of muting to help you gain expressive control over your sound…
  16. Chop – You can combine different types of muting with strumming to make some interesting effects and rhythmic patterns…
  17. Play with a Rhythm Track – Being able to keep time is an essential skill in order to play with others, or multi-track your own creations…
  18. Record Yourself – Recording and hearing yourself played back can be very instructive…
  19. Ear Training – Open Chords – Hearing chords is a little more difficult than hearing the melody lines.  Let’s start by listening to and playing back some simple open chords…
  20. Song Writing – Rhythm and Harmony Lines – Record a single note melody line from  your Song Writing – Lyrics and Melody Lines lesson.  Play it back and try playing some chords.  See which ones fit…

Intermediate

  1. Seventh Position Notes – Just like the first position notes, the seventh position notes are easy to get down if you learn one string at a time…
  2. Reading Tab – Tablature (TAB) is another way to notate guitar parts…
  3. Hammer Ons and Pull Offs – A Hammer On is a technique where you rapidly, with some force, put a finger of your fretting hand down on a string to make it sound…
  4. Picking Styles – There are a lot of ways to use the pick to control or influence the sound…
  5. Fingerstyle – Using the finters of your right hand independently opens up a whole new style of playing with it’s own sonic texture…
  6. Ear Training – Arpeggios and Ornaments – Arpeggios are broken chords.  Let’s start by listening to and playing back the notes of some broken chords…
  7. Song Writing – Fingerstyle – Go back to one of your chord progressions from your Song Writing – Rhythm and Harmony Lines less.  Instead of strumming the chords, play a pattern with your right hand over the left hand fingerings…
  8. Bar Chords (CAGED) – Bar chords allow you to play chords in any part of the neck for fast changes and tight voicings.  There are 5 basic chord shapes that are movable…
  9. Reading Lead Sheets – Lead sheets are a form of short hand notation, designed to write quickly and take less space…
  10. 12 bar Blues – The Blues is credited with being an important influence on rock and roll, jazz and most modern genres…
  11. Ear Training – Bar Chords – Bar chords can have a different sound than open chords.  Let’s start by listening to and playing back some chords…
  12. Song Writing – Rock and Blues – Blues is based on the I – IV – V chords… Rock pulls from a larger palette…
  13. Scales and Key Signatures – Have you ever wondered how they decided which sharps and flats make up a key?…
  14. Circle of 5ths – The Circle of 5ths is a diagram used as a quick reference for all sorts of key and chord information.  Here’s how it works…
  15. Transcribe Easy Songs – Have you ever wondered: “How did I play that?”  That’s the problem the Ear Training exercises should help you solve…
  16. Pentatonic Scales – One of the oldest scales is the Pentatonic Scale.  Much of modern rock is based on it…
  17. Slide – The Slide is a technique where you play a fretted note as normal, and then slide your fretting finger to another fret, usually up 1 or 2 frets…
  18. String Bends – Bending strings is a technique where you play a string as normal and then bend the string with your fretting hand to raise the pitch of the note…
  19. Tremolo and Vibrato – Tremolo means different things to different people…
  20. Blues Scales – There have been several variations of the Blues Scale used over the years.  Most commonly, the Blues Scale refers to the 6 note scale derived by adding a #4 / b5 note to the Pentatonic Scale…
  21. Playing Blues Lead – The Blues isn’t just a scale or chord progression, but rather a particular feel…
  22. Sight Reading – Get an easy book of music in the key of C (no sharps or flats) and practice sight reading…
  23. Play all the way through – Pick an easy song you like.  Set your metronome to a nice slow pace…
  24. Write Short Songs – Short songs are often long phrases, or the stitching together of a couple smaller phrases…
  25. Play Along with Backing Tracks – Playing along with a Backing Track can be more interesting than playing to a click, and encourages you to play complete songs at speed.  It’s good practice for playing with others…

Advanced

  1. Know All the Notes – Learn the Entire Fretboard in Days, not years!…
  2. Chord Construction – Chords are built from the notes of the scale or key…
  3. Triads in Every Position – This gives you alternate ways of playing the Basic Triads…
  4. Harmonics – If you lightly touch a finger to a string at a node, pluck it and quickly remove your finger from the node, you can hear a bell like harmonic sound…
  5. Advanced Chords in Every Position – Here we build on Triads in Every Position…

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